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Archive for September, 2014


Round 6 and the 20-miler

September 20, 2014

A“A goal is just an awesome way to force growth on yourself.” –Deana Kastor

She is an Olympic bronze medalist (Athens 2004), a 2:19:36 marathoner, and the only American woman to break 2:20.  I paused when I read that quote from her in an article in the October issue of Runner’s World magazine.  She had put it succinctly what my running (and sacrifice) is all about: Growth.

For the past couple of weeks I have logged lots and lots of miles, and being a slow runner that means lots of time to think, contemplate, and breath.   If my Fitbit is correct, that means a weekly average of more than 100,000 steps, 52+ miles run/walk, and almost 20,000 calories burned.  However, what it does not tell you are the other activities I do or my almost daily 5:00 am start at the gym to cross-train, yoga, and stretch.

What gives?

That’s the point.  Why bother.  I know I will not win Chicago or NYC marathons or could even qualify for Boston.  I am a slow runner, who goes weekly to chemo treatment as a past time, a vegetarian by choice, husband, father, grandfather, and breadwinner.  And yet I push myself to get up early morning to hit the gym.

Well, I have grown just like what Deena said.  My training and change of lifestyle forced me to grow.  In return I like myself more.  I am able to fully appreciate life by earning it one mile at a time.  I don’t miss steak or pork or the late morning rise because I am able to see things differently.  Other people have notice the changed too.  It is all good.

Round 6 and the 20-miler

Last Wednesday, September 17, was my sixth round of treatment and tomorrow, Sunday, is our 20 mile run.  I have never done this before–short chemo recovery and 20 miles/32K–so we will see if I will still be standing up.  It is a prelude to the Chicago marathon in three weeks: October 12.  I feel good, anxious, and looking forward to it.  I try not to think of the distance because it can get to you.  All I know is I will be at the start and how I finish is the fun of it.  See you at the finish line.

Cheers.

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Scan results: Stable.
September 9, 2014

TThere was a delay in getting the results because LindaJ, the nurse practitioner who monitors my progress, was on vacation.  I saw the email she sent asking me to call her.  So I was anxious to find out the result.

I also received a notice from the UofC MyChart  web application that the results of my test was just posted.  My eyes went to the summary right away filtering the medical jargon:

“No significant change in multiple pulmonary metastases.  New new lesions identified.”

“Your tumors are stable,” adds Linda.  The rest are normal.

That is all I wish.  We catch up on other things but my mind is already on being grateful for the positive news.  Fighting cancer is a game of inches and centimeters; in my case 3.8 cm. for one of them.  I have been in this situation before and at this point you just take what is given; and in whatever form.  I just have to keep on working at it.

After hanging up with Linda, I went to church to give thanks.  I am sure my mother will be happy when she reads this: me going to church on a Tuesday and the positive news of my scan.

Cheers.

P.S.  Tomorrow back to chemo, Round 5.  Then try to recover fast and build more miles.

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Another scan: All seats taken.
September 3, 2014

All the seats were taken, all 18 of them. Some had blank stares in their eyes probably because they are hungry. You are not allowed to eat anything before your test. There we were, me included, waiting for our turn to have a CT or PET scan performed. In the background, the Price is Right show was showing and all were glued to the TV watching to see if the lady is going to win the brand new Porshe 911 Carrera.  The car would surely turn heads and fits into the category of a chick (or guy) magnet car.

Earlier I had already checked in and I am just waiting for them to call my name to have my CT scan done. The scan is one of those test I have to do to see if my tumor shrank again after two rounds of chemo.

“Oh no!” A collective sigh of regret filled the waiting room.  “She should have not taken the $3000 money. Oh my god, she guessed all the numbers and could have won the Porshe!” That is easy for us to say watching in the waiting room.  The car was worth $92K.  Ooopps.

Price is Right is an appropriate TV show for waiting rooms. That and People’s Court or Judge Judy.  It is neutral and entertaining enough to distract you from all your medical problems.  CNN is depressing.  Soap opera: nausea.  Sports: drama

“Alvarez.” The technician calls my name and puts me back to reality.  He hands me a big glass of clear liquid. “Finish the drink in an hour and I will be back so we can do the test.” He goes on and calls other three names and gives them same drink and instructions.

I asked for a straw.  The tech gives me one, then I realize it was a mistake.  The others were all drinking it straight up from the cup, including the lady in the far corner.  Damm people: This is not a beer cup and we are not in a bar.  Whatever.  I might as well drink, er..rather sip, this tasteless concoction with my pinky finger raised.

Raising the cup I start sipping.  The drink is not bad, I have had better prep drinks before.  The best one is from MD Anderson, which comes in different flavors and a choice of sugar-free or not. (I posted a picture of the drink in my previous post in June.  Check that out).  I was the last one to finish which made me think if the straw was a good idea.  It didn’t matter we all waited and try to get distracted.  Gone are the hunger pangs only to be replaced by bloatedness from the drink.  I am hoping for good results like the one last August 8th.  We will see.

CT scan prep drink... burp!

CT scan prep drink… burp!

Ding…ding…ding. Come on down!

Cheers.

P.S.  I drafted the post before being called for the scan.  The scan calls for a dye being infused during the procedure so your organs will light up.  Your body will have this warm and hot feeling when the dye is infused.  Right after the infusion and scan things got dicey: I had an allergic reaction to the dye they gave me.  I was flushed, itchy, palpating, and full of rashes and hives.  I called for my wife and when she saw me she had the look of concern.  A doctor was attending to me and I was red like a lobster.  They gave me benedryl and put me in a room for observation.  I have had these procedures many times but this is the first time I had an allergic reaction.  The medicine took effect and slowly my allergies cleared but it left me groggy and sleepy.  All is fine now.  Am back to normal.  Just another excitement to spice up my life.  Ha!

What happened?  S**t happens.

 

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